British Society for Haematology. Listening. Learning. Leading British Society for Haematology. Listening. Learning. Leading
29 November 2018

As I write this message, I am preparing to be videoed about the 2019 BSH Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM) in Glasgow! This will be a happy opportunity to celebrate Haematology and bring to life the key message that ‘Haematology is central to the practice of medicine’. Working together with our American Society of Hematology (ASH) colleagues, we will highlight the global impact of Haematology advances. In addition, the Presidential symposium will discuss how we future-proof Haematology in the 'NHS beyond 70'.  Altogether, it will be a world class programme focused on exciting, educating and leaving you feeling proud to be working in Haematology

Within the rich diversity of Haematology practice are many rare conditions. The King’s Fund recently convened a round-table discussion on Rare Diseases, which I was delighted to be part of. There are 24 European Reference Networks that provide a virtual space for collaboration and invaluable support to those living with rare conditions, including access to innovative treatments. My view is that the UK should continue to participate in these networks, with haematology joining as a united force to collectively support affected patients. Many of the patient charities will be present at the BSH ASM on 1-3 April 2019 and I look forward to welcoming them and you to this important event.

A thriving UK Haematology community requires an efficient and effective BSH Board. I am lucky to chair an excellent Board, which includes lay Trustees bringing fresh and independent professional skills. The health of Haematology now and into the future requires this continual replenishment of talent that reflects the diversity of our practice and stage in our careers. I therefore urge you to think that you can make a difference and step forward for forthcoming elections to the Board.

With my best wishes, as always,

Professor Cheng-Hock Toh